Infection and Immunology (IIC)

About Us

  The Infection and Immunology Cluster comprises a network of researchers focused on scientific, clinical and social issues related to infectious diseases and immunology. The IIC cluster aims to contribute to the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches for the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases, immune responses to infection and general immune system dysfunction. The Cluster promotes interdisciplinary collaborative research and plays a central role in both undergraduate and postgraduate education in the infectious diseases and immunology areas.

“Infectious diseases remain the major cause of death worldwide. Improved diagnostics, advances in understanding microbial virulence mechanisms and the immunological basis of a range of human diseases underpins efforts to devise new therapeutic approaches”.

Our Research Areas

Biofilm and Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms in Staphylococci

Biofilm and Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms in Staphylococci

Prof O’Gara’s research addresses the problem of healthcare associated infections focusing on understanding virulence mechanisms in Staphylococcus aureus including MRSA and S. epidermidis isolates that have caused biofilm-associated infections associated with implanted medical devices, with the aim of identifying new prevention and treatment strategies.

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Recombinant Protein Expression and Engineering

Recombinant Protein Expression and Engineering

Dr Wall’s research focus is on the expression in E. coli and engineering of recombinant proteins for applications is disease detection and diagnosis, drug delivery, and biomaterials functionalisation.

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Nucleic Acid Based Diagnostics Technologies for Infectious Disease

Nucleic Acid Based Diagnostics Technologies for Infectious Disease

Dr Barry’s research is focused on the discovery, design, development and optimization of novel biomarkers for use in rapid nucleic acid diagnostics (NAD) technologies for infectious disease microorganisms.

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Pathogenic Mechanisms Group

Pathogenic Mechanisms Group

Dr Boyd’s Pathogenic Mechanisms group characterises the molecular mechanisms deployed by bacteria in order to colonise, survive and multiply during infection. By identifying and characterising the mechanisms that a bacterium uses to ensure its survival and persistence in a human or animal, these molecular activities can then be targeted for the development of antimicrobials and therapeutics.

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Molecular Responses to Stress in Food-borne Bacterial Pathogens

Molecular Responses to Stress in Food-borne Bacterial Pathogens

Dr O’Byrne’s research group focuses on two model food-borne bacterial pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. The emphasis of the work is on understanding the mechanisms that allow these organisms sense and respond to environmental stresses. Understanding how pathogenic bacteria sense and respond to changes in their environment is critical if we are to devise rational strategies to prevent their entry into the food chain and to prevent infections from arising in the human population.

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